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20121224
20130101
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Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
, to have an endangerment finding, you have to have it based on science. what science would you use? she said, we would use the united nations, the inter governmental panel on climate change. it cooperate have been better -- it couldn't have been better timing. you talk about poetic justice, governor, it was a matter of days that clay mat gate came in. remember climate gate? it shows without a shadow of the doubt that the united nations has been cooking this science for a long period of time. >> it is amazing. when you bring these things to light a lot of americans are shocked to realize that you and the last few in the senate may be the last backstop before this administration takes us into some international treaty, international law, international agreement that none of us really would ever agree to. >> there are people i serve with who think it is not a good idea. what about our sovereignty? that's what it is all about. nonetheless, this did come from them. you have to keep in mind that -- you and i can both remember when the democrats' primary source of funding in washington was the
, science changes. nothing is more worthless than a science textbook from the '50s. >> the word shouldn't change from the original constitution, surely. >> my words aren't based on the constitution. >> i get that, but what it is is about fairness and equality. i went to see "lincoln" the movie a few weeks ago. it was a riveting movie. daniel day-lewis was great as lincoln. it was all about how he fought in his last few months as president to get slavery abolished. there were millions of americans who thought slavery was acceptable who were outraged at what he was doing. he was not trying to make something popular for the moment. he knew instinctively it was just wrong, unfair, unequal. >> and why did he know that? because it's in the bible. >> but we -- >> it's in the bible. he was building it on biblical truth. the bible says that every man should be free. >> right, but you don't think every man should be free and equal. >> no -- of course we're free. and of course we're equal. >> what does that mean? >> you can love anybody you want to. >> but you don't think a gay man or woman should
his testimony before the house science, space and technology committee. i know that our chairman mr. hall will remember that during that testimony, he argued eloquently for the critical importance of giving nasa a sustainable future and a human exploration program that can once again inspire our children and humanity around the world. it seems rather extraordinary that even as we are honoring our hero, neil armstrong, that we face a situation where nasa's budget would be designated, getting the very programs that neil armstrong felt so passionately about. if the same members who vote to honor him today will commit to working in the coming months and years for those exploration goals, to those heights to which he devoted the last years of his life, we will have truly honored neil armstrong in an enduring and meaningful way. with that, i reserve the balance of my time. the speaker pro tempore: the gentlewoman reserves. the gentleman from texas. mr. hall: madam speaker, i yield five minutes to the very capable majority whip, the gentleman from california, mr. mccarthy. the speaker pro
reported in the history of science. the last ten years goes down as the hottest ten years recorded in the history of science and that means more wacky weather, more moisture, more energy. global warming is a misnomer. it should be called global swing. >> which means the world doesn't end tomorrow. it's just every little event is worse or inkre meantycrementally worse than before. >> you look at all the glaciers are receding. the ice caps has diminished by 50% just in the last 50 years. an area the size of united states in terms of ice disappeared this year over the polar ice caps. the seasons are changing. summer is longer winter is shorter, tropical diseases are moving north. all the indicators show that the earth is warming up and that's what's driving some of this wacky weather. >> duh that show more or could we snap back? >> get used to it. we could be experiencing more 100-year flooding storms, hurricanes because there's more energy circumstance lating. we could argue how much human activity is driving it but everybody agrees the earth is heating up ther
him, nd he'll set money aside from his first day of work to his last, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >> announcer: 'tis the season of more-- more shopping, more dining out... and along with it, more identity theft. by the time this holiday season is over, an estimated 1.2 million identities may be stolen. every time you pull out your wallet, shop online or hit the road, you give thieves a chance to ruin your holiday. by the time you're done watching this, as many as 40 more identities may be stolen. you can't be on the lookout 24/7, but lifelock can. they're relentless about protecting your identity every minute of every day. when someone tries to take over your bank accounts, drain the equity in your home, or even tries to buy a car in your name, lifelock is on guard. and with lifelock's 24/7 alerts, they contact you by text, phone or email as soon as they detect suspicious activity in their network. lifelock wants you to be protected this holiday season, so they're giving you 60 days of protection risk-free. >> my years as a prosecutor taugh
to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. [ buzzing ] bye dad. drive safe. k. love you. [ chirping, buzzing continues ] [ horn honks ] [ buzzing continues ] [ male announcer ] the sprint drive first app. blocks and replies to texts while you drive. we can live without the &. visit sprint.com/drive. we can live without the &. restore revive rejuvenate rebuild rebuild rebuild >>> more breaking news now. the senate late tonight approving a $60.4 billion bill to rebuild after superstorm sandy. now, it goes to the house, but if both chambers fail to agree on a package before the current congressional term expires, then everyone will have to start again from scratch. >>> keeping them honest, this has been the least productive congress in modern history. at last count, a little more than 200 bills enacted. by comparison, the 80th congress, which then-president harry truman called the do-nothing congress, it managed to pass 906 bills into law. think about that as you watch the next report about one of the few things lawma
science? >> not only that we actually lose ten years. >> reporter: the downside of turning off a variety of experiments is what? >> we've killed innovation. because the most innovative projects are the projects that will go first. >> reporter: the pending budget cuts have also forced labs to slow down the hiring of promising younger scientists. >> turning them down because i have to say to them, in all honesty, i don't know whether i can take you on on that four to five year commitment. >> reporter: the nih hopes to restore the lost 10% if the agency's funding restored but this is one danger from the fiscal cliff that isn't waiting for new year's day. the reduction in medical experiments and the hold on laboratory jobs is happening now. wyatt andrews, cbs news, washington. >>> 5:04 now. some of them don't even know it yet but dozens of former california prison inmates got pardons for christmas. governor brown issued the pardons to 79 convicted felons who have done their full-time and have been -- time and have been crime free now for more than a decade. they include ken benedict who got
. we look at the major advances in science and technology. "newsroom" starts now. good morning. thank you so much for being with us. i'm carol costello wishing you and yours a very merry christmas. we begin this hour with pope benedict using his annual christmas message to speak about the hope for peace even in the most difficult times and situations. just hours ago the 85-year-old pope spoke before a crowd in st. peter's square and to millions of others watching around the world he says even in syria, a nation embroiled in a nearly two-year long civil war, peace is possible. >> translator: may peace bring for the people of syria, deeply wounded and divided by a conflict which does not spare even the defenseless and reaps innocent victims. once again, i appeal for an end to the bloodshed. easier access for the relief of refugees and the displaced and dialogue in the pursuit of a political solution to the conflict. >> the pope also spoke out against violence against christians in nigeria and wrapped up his address by delivering christmas greetings in 65 languages. >>> in bethlehem peop
straightforward guidance and be able to focus on other things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. it's just common sense. with a new project in mind, some how-to knowledge to give us an new years clutter is no match for someone with big ideas. edge, and more savings down every aisle. it only takes a few twists and turns for those bright ideas to make the new year even brighter. more saving. more doing. that's the power of the home depot. start fresh and save with hdx 20 gallon totes, a special buy at just $5.88 a piece. >>> washington, d.c. just before the sun comes up. earlier in week maureen dowd, the great maureen dowd of the new york tim"new york times" ha the op-ed page of times and the headline was "why god?" it was largely written about her friend father kevin o'neal a catholic priest in washington who began his mini essay within maureen's column by asking the question how does one celebrate christmas with the fresh memory of 20 children and 7 adults ruthlessly murdered in newtown? father o'neal went on to write, first, i do not expe
. this summer, he showed us the science behind every shape, size, and shade of these pixels. >> you now have your camouflage. so we're trying to trick the brainseeing things that aren't actually there. >> reporter: digital shapes creates depth and shadows where none exist. that's today's design. >> what's coming up down the road and very quickly is the harry potter cloak. >> what is that? >> reporter: with that fictional cloak, harry isn't just camouflaged, he's invisible. >> my body's gone! >> how invisible are we talking here? if i walked into a room with a soldier wearing one of these cloaks -- >> you wouldn't see him at all. he would be completely invisible to you. >> reporter: this isn't make-believe. the military has seen this so-called quantum stealth technology. it works by bending the light around an object, even concealing most of a person's shadow. imagine what that could do for a sniper, hiding in a field, or the american pilots who ejected over libya when their fighter jets crashed last year. >> they could actually pull out, very similar to what they carry with a survival blanke
isn't rocket science. it's just common sense. from td ameritrade. >>> good morning, him ecarol costello. it's 30 minutes past the hour. time to check our top stories. we're 30 seconds away from the start of trading at the new york stock exchange. representatives from the new york national guard are ringing the opening bell today. [ bell ringing ] more than 4,000 guards and airmen helped the victims of superstorm sandy. investors are still concerned about the looming fiscal cliff. >>> blizzard warning in up to six states. in arkansas the national guard has been called to provide ambulance service for residents. heavy snow and strong winds will lead to whiteout conditions across the ohio river valley. the heaviest snow is expected to move into western pennsylvania and new york state this afternoon. >>> hundreds of american families wanting to adopt russian children may have their dreams dashed. they have given final approval for a ban on such adoptions, seen as payback for a recently signed u.s. law imposing travel and financial restrictions on human rights abusers in russia. >>>
gifts but others say they have it down to a science. >> make it in, say you that don't want it and they exchange it or -- they usually give you store credit. they won't give you money back. >> don't take it back, that's rude, just give it to someone else. >> may work. other people say instead of trading something they donate their unwanted gifts to charity. >> stanford fans headed to this year's rose ball game to see the cardinals battle wisconsin. the stadium is having a face lift but the big project is taking longer than expected. project managers say it's not going to be finished until 2015. >>> san jose state will play in the military bowl. it'll face bowling green. a team that ranks 7th in the nation. experts prwill come away with the win. the military bowl is set to kick off tomorrow at noon. >> should be a lot of fun. we are keeping track on the traffic. we understand there is caltrain delays. >> up to an hourlong and this is because of a system wide mechanical failure. trains in the north and southbound direction are impacted. we have a lot of spin outs in the s
becomes a reality. >> reporter: a harsh reality but one with some science behind it. last year, researchers of sanford university found out once participants were introduced to their future self, they were more likely to save. sounds good in theory but not experts agree it will actually work in practice. >> i'm not actually sure a stark financial physical picture is exactly what they need in order to compel them to action. >> reporter: with more americans retiring later in life and the cost of living going up, experts say two-thirds of boomers will not have enough saved to maintain their standard of live, if they can retire at all. whether or not it will actually inspire people to take action, it certainly gets you thinking. >> it does inspire me to save for retirement, absolutely. >> reporter: now, a big thank you to our brave guinea pig, the 2,000 people who logged on to view this app, unclear how many have been spurred as we heard a lot about new year's resolutions right around the corner, if they get to the new year and decide this was scary enough to get them to start savi
is everything this morning. it may even influence what you're doing for the holidays. a poll by civic science shows that 35% in the midwest plan to work on christmas day. that is the larchl evident group of americans to do so. folks in the northeast are partiers. they'll attend more parties. people in the south seem to be chilling. 29 expect to not work during the halds. >> and in the midwest . >>> kenny rogers was once voted farchts si favorite singer of all time. this year he might be northern new jersey's favorite santa. we'll show you what he's doing for kids affecting by superstorm sandy. that's ahead on superstorm sandy. [ female announcer ] mcdonald's dollar menu. home of the meaty, melty mcdouble you love. and other amazing tastes for just a dollar each. every day, as always, there's a lot to love for a little on mcdonald's dollar menu. ♪ but the acidic levels in some foods can cause acid erosion. the enamel starts to wear down, and you can't grow your enamel back. my dentist recommended that i use pronamel, because it helps to strengthen the enamel. and i believe it's doing a good
guidance and be able focus on othe things, like each other, which isn't rocket science. it's justommon sense. from td ameritrade. dennis: throw the bums out, don brown says that is the only way to prevent future fiscal cliff to limit politicians' to a single term. here's news that makes washington talk look like kabuki theater, strike threat for east coast ports would arrest as negotiators get a deal. for the more distinguished members of the audience, read old, dick tracy comic strip with a two way wristwatch radio, we will tell you how apple may be about to top it. shibani: 30 past the hour stocks every 15 minutes. lauren simonetti is here now, barnes and noble up big time, surprising considering they did not have a good christmas. >> big winner on good volume. barnes and noble shares up 6% and even more in the free-market but that is right. they did say their preliminary holiday sales come in weaker than expected and also plan on raising a warning about their -- bad news which they gave second, the first piece of information they gave which puts the stock up 12% was that pearson wit
, religion, science, philosophy, sports. whether the empire got it right last week, didn't call it second base. whether or not the nature of dark matter will be first discovered by microphysicists rather than astrophysicists. it's all part of the speech and thought and belief that's protected by the first amendment. you can't think of it just in political terms. it's important. and there's a third dimension. speech is what allows you to define your persona, your personality. your speech, your thought, your beliefs or who you are. and this is an essential human right. now, the supreme court in its first amendment cases has protected speech. that is hideous. we only get those cases we had a case recently protecting speech, videos, where it was described to me, i never look at these things, women in spikes heels killing little animals. we protected the oath. it was protected speech. we protected speech when on the day of a funeral of a service man killed in the middle east, there were protesters using derogatory words about gays, saying the military is all going to be doomed to predition bec
the hangover cure. drumroll. it's asparagus. according to the institute of medical science in south korea, thank you, south korea, asparagus and the minerals found in there extract many -- it helps your liver cells and it helps filter. that is why your pee sometimes smells different after you -- i'm just saying. >> and we have plenty of unique polkas this past year. this one started with our maestro, barry mitchell. ♪ who needs flowers, who needs sweets ♪ ♪ pledge your love with techs and tweets ♪ ♪ it's the valentine's polka ♪ even if you're not a hunk you can always text your junk ♪ ♪ that's the valentine's polka ♪ seems like just the 1% are making all the bucks ♪ ♪ like the vampire said the economy sure sucks ♪ ♪ that's the paula polka everyone sing. ♪ that's the paula polka ♪ we love to read your comments always in such a large amount ♪ ♪ it's good to spell and punctuation and grammar don't count ♪ ♪ you like us, we like you, it's the facebook polka ♪ ♪ it's late at night, you're wide awake and you're not wearing pants ♪ ♪ so grab your "wo
10 science stories of the 2012. >> reporter: at number 10, a revolutionary camera called litro. >> it's so powerful that this will forever change how we're experience pictures. >> reporter: the camera captures the entire light field allowing the picture's focus and perspective to be changed after it's been taken. number 9, nasa's dawn space craft spent back data about an asteroid called vesta. it appears vesta went through some stages of planetary evolution. it's one of a kind in the solar system. >> what's clear to us is vesta appears to be the only intact protoplanet that's left. >> reporter: number 8. you may have heard the god partg dlo big deal? think big bang theory. >> this particle we think was the fuse that set off the explosion which created the universe. >> reporter: researchers found after analyzing data from proton collisions generated by a particle accelerator. at 7, baumgartner's record breaking jump. he broke the sound barrier, jumping from 128,000 feet in a revolutionary space suit. >> i said i know the whole world is watching now and i wish the world could see what
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)